Emergency Powers, Renewed Every Year, Have Kept The Constitution Suspended Since 1933!

Socio-Economics History Blog

  • Published on Nov 3, 2014
    http://www.undergroundworldnews.com

    Under the Trading with the Enemy Act of 1917 (“TWEA”), starting with Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933, presidents had the power to declare emergencies without limiting their scope or duration, without citing the relevant statutes, and without congressional oversight.[1] The Supreme Court in Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer limited what a president could do in such an emergency, but did not limit the emergency declaration power itself. A 1973 Senate investigation found (in Senate Report 93-549) that four declared emergencies remained in effect: the 1933 banking crisis with respect to the hoarding of gold,[2] a 1950 emergency with respect to the Korean War,[3] a 1970 emergency regarding a postal workers strike, and a 1971 emergency in response to inflation.[4] Title V, Section 502 of P.L. 94-412 specifically exempts the statutorily authority cited in the Proclamations of these four declared states of national…

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